Why Time Management Doesn’t Work

February 18th, 2012

I’m getting ready to re-vision my blog. By that I mean I’m going to take a short break to brainstorm some great ideas for future posts. I want to make this a place you can stop by to pick up handy tips and inspirational messages to help you in your day-to-day life, as well as catch a weekly laugh.

That being said, I don’t want to just leave you high and dry while I work up a new plan, so I’ll be re-posting some of the best from the last year. Enjoy!

Why Time Management Doesn’t Work

Like most people, I often complain about the amount of time I don’t have. I’ve tried a variety of time management strategies with different degrees of success. Yet all the complaining in the world and no number of time management tools ever seem to keep time from slipping through my fingers. I always wondered what I was doing wrong. Was I just lazy?

Then I read Joy Held’s May 9, 2011, Monday Meditation: Time and Herding Cats. It clicked. Maybe it will for you, too.

Monday Meditation: Time And Herding Cats
by Joy Held

“Time management” is an oxymoron. We can’t possibly manage time. It does what it wants regardless of our efforts to wrangle it into submission. It marches on no matter what. Trying to manage time is frustrating because it’s a little like herding cats or nailing Jello (trademark) to a tree. Time has a mind and a mission of its own. Time cannot be told what to do and it cannot be beat into submission. But time rules the world and we will continue to know frustration until we develop a different relationship with time.

Read the rest of the post.

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Meditation and prayer often go hand in hand. When you need ideas on simple ways to pray you can find a good resource in my book Simply Prayer, available in print, for Kindle and NookAudio book version coming soon.

Why Time Management Doesn’t Work

June 22nd, 2011

time photo
Like most people, I often complain about the amount of time I don’t have. I’ve tried a variety of time management strategies with different degrees of success. Yet all the complaining in the world and no number of time management tools ever seem to keep time from slipping through my fingers. I always wondered what I was doing wrong. Was I just lazy?

Then I read Joy Held’s May 9, 2011, Monday Meditation: Time and Herding Cats. It clicked. Maybe it will for you, too.

Monday Meditation: Time And Herding Cats
by Joy Held

“Time management” is an oxymoron. We can’t possibly manage time. It does what it wants regardless of our efforts to wrangle it into submission. It marches on no matter what. Trying to manage time is frustrating because it’s a little like herding cats or nailing Jello (trademark) to a tree. Time has a mind and a mission of its own. Time cannot be told what to do and it cannot be beat into submission. But time rules the world and we will continue to know frustration until we develop a different relationship with time.

Read the rest of the post.

Photo by bogenfreund

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There are a lot more ideas and examples on simple ways to pray in my book Simply Prayer. Ebook version available for NookKindleKobo, and Scribd.

Or Pay What You Want for the audiobook.

The Benefits of Meditation

May 25th, 2011

meditation photoAlthough I’ve always thought meditating on a regular basis was a good idea, it wasn’t until I read the following article that I understood just how beneficial it could be.

Apparently, meditating at least 30 minutes per day can alter the brain, creating higher density in gray matter where it counts (i.e. the area controlling memory, empathy, sense of self) and lower density in regions that affect how we deal with things like anxiety and stress.

All in all, even if there are no other changes within the brain than being able to cope with stress better, doing some form of daily meditation is worth the extra 30 minutes per day we need to squeeze into our already packed schedules.

How Meditation May Change the Brain

By SINDYA N. BHANOO

Over the December holidays, my husband went on a 10-day silent meditation retreat. Not my idea of fun, but he came back rejuvenated and energetic.

He said the experience was so transformational that he has committed to meditating for two hours daily, one hour in the morning and one in the evening, until the end of March. He’s running an experiment to determine whether and how meditation actually improves the quality of his life.

I’ll admit I’m a skeptic.

But now, scientists say that meditators like my husband may be benefiting from changes in their brains. Read the rest of the post.